1968, The Year That Rocked Washington: Before visiting the exhibit Lesson A

Title

1968, The Year That Rocked Washington: Before visiting the exhibit Lesson A

Subject

Nineteen sixty-eight, A.D.
Washington (State) -- History -- 20th century.
United States -- History -- 20th century.

Creator

Callie Birklid
Joshua Parker

Publisher

Legacy Washington, Office of the Secretary of State

Date

2018

Rights

Except where otherwise noted, this work by Legacy Washington is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License. All logos and trademarks are property of their respective owners.

Introduction

[Grades 4-12]

1968: The Year That Rocked Washington features a collection of online oral history profiles and a public exhibit inside the State Capitol Building that explores the lives of 19 Washingtonians caught up in one of the most tumultuous years in world history. With profiles, compelling photos and artifacts, Legacy Washington documents activism and aftershocks of a landmark year in world history. View the online exhibit and profiles.

1968: The Year That Rocked Washington includes middle school curriculum with accommodations and adjustments available to upper elementary and high school.

The lesson plans follow the inquiry arc as outlined in the College, Career, Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards and are common core aligned (Washington State standards) to challenge students in essential reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. These plans are poised to engage students before, during, and after visiting the 1968  project and exhibit (either in person or online).

Lesson Objectives

  • EQ: Was ‘68 a watershed year of change for WA?
  • EQ: What was going on in the 1960s that rocked Washington and the world?
At the end of this lesson students will...
  • Have an understanding of major events of the 1960s through the eyes of people from Washington State.
  • Be able to place important events on a timeline.
  • Categorize major events into international, national, and state events.
  • Categorize events into political, social, and cultural events.

Materials

  • Opener excerpts
  • Student Handout (note sheet, timeline, reflections)

Standards

Common Core Reading
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.1.  Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2.  Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
Common Core Writing
State Social Studies Standards
  • History: Understands historical chronology.
  • History: Understands that there are multiple perspectives and interpretations of historical events.

Activity

Before the Lesson:
    • Elementary: Students should have an understanding of major political, social, and cultural movements that were going on in the 1960’s. These could include, but are not limited to Civil Rights, Women's Rights, Conservation, Anti-Vietnam War, Art and culture, etc. Teacher may want to take the approach of looking at important national figures (Dr. King, Abbie Hoffman, President Kennedy, etc.).
      • This could be done through readings, images, audio recording, video, charts, and maps.
      • Use what is appropriate and meets the needs of students.
    • Middle School: Students should have an understanding of events that led to the different political, social, and cultural movement that occurred in the 1960’s. This could include but is not limited to the end of WWII, Rise of Communism, the Baby Boom, Brown v. Board decision, etc.
      • This could be done through readings, images, audio recording, video, charts, and maps.
      • Use what is appropriate and meets the needs of students.
    • High School: Students should have an understanding of how different patterns and factors lead to political, social, and cultural change. They should also have an understanding of how context influences the perspective of individuals during different historical eras.
      • This could be done through readings, images, audio recording, video, charts, and maps.
      • Use what is appropriate and meets the needs of students.
Entry Task:
    • Have students brainstorm definitions and give examples of political, social, cultural movements.
Activity:

Part 1

    • Give students one of the opener excerpts, a short reading of people profiled in the 1968 exhibit.
    • Have students read and gain an understanding of the following:
      • What are the characteristics of the people that said the quote or are being discussed in the quote?
      • Summarize what the reading says.
      • Does the reading discuss a political, social, or cultural event?
      • Does the reading discuss an international, national, or Washington based event?
Scaffolds for support:

For students or classes that need more support teachers could:
    • Assign a smaller selection of readings to the class.
    • Edit the readings to meet the needs of students.
    • Highlight key words or phrases to help point students in the right direction.
    • Allow students to work in groups of 2 or more to come up with a common summary.
For more advanced students teachers could:
    • Add higher level questions to the student handout in the summary section.
    • Have student make comparisons to current events.
Part 2
    • Students will share their information from the reading they were assigned.
    • Students will participate in an activity where a student shares their information and then trades readings with another student and then shares with different student.
    • This should go on until each student has gather information from at least 4 different students.
Scaffolds for support

For students or classes that need more support teachers could:
    • Do the sharing of information as a whole class activity.
Part 3
    • Once students have gathered information from different sources have them get into groups of 2-4 and work on the timeline portion of the student handout.
      • Note: students may not get information from all of the different readings in the activity.
    • On the timeline students will place events in chronological order and label them as political, social, or cultural as well as international, national, or Washington based.
    • Once students have plotted all their they should work others to add to their timeline.
Scaffolds for support:

For students or classes that need more support teachers could:
    • Do this as a whole class activity.
    • Have students work in groups of 2 or more.
    • Make a list of the events and classify them as political, social, or cultural and international, national, or Washington based for the students to refer to as they put together their timeline.
For more advanced students teachers could:
    • Have students make predictions about the causes and effects of the different events.
    • Have students make connections between historical events and current events.
Reflection:
    • After the students have built their timelines have students reflect on the following questions on their student handout:
      • What surprised you about what you learned today?
      • What changed, challenged, or confirmed your think prior to today?
      • What questions do you still have about events from the 1960’s that rocked Washington and the world?
Scaffolds for support:

For students or classes that need more support teachers could:
    • Have students answer one question

Formative Assessment

The completed student handout could be the formative assessment of this lesson
Exit ticket ideas:
  • Reflection section on the student handout.
  • Students could pick one event (international, national, or Washington based) that ‘they think is the most important to the people of Washington in the 1960’s.
1968, The Year That Rocked Washington: Before visiting the exhibit Lesson A